Can You Make Tofu From Store Bought Soy Milk?

It is common to wonder if one can make tofu from store-bought soy milk. Tofu, which is a plant-based protein source, has gained popularity over the years. It is one of the best protein sources for vegans or vegetarians. 

Made from soybeans curd, tofu is considered to be gluten-free and also great for a calorie deficit diet. There is an excellent amount of nutrients to be benefitted from eating tofu as it is rich in protein, calcium, and iron.

Although it may be better to make tofu with dried soybeans, a lot of people may find it difficult and exhaustive. Hence the question: can you make tofu from store-bought soy milk?

Yes, making tofu from store-bought soy milk is very much possible. The universal way of making tofu is by using dried soybeans, however, you can still compromise by making tofu with store-bought tofu you already have at home. 

This method may take less of your time but there are a ton of things you need to know before putting those soy milk to use in your kitchen. It might be a bit tricky using your store-bought soy milk for tofu but this is why this article is right for you. 

Stick around you are about to learn so much about preparing tofu from store-bought soy milk. 

Is It Okay To Make Tofu From Store-Bought Soy Milk?

Of course, you can use store-bought soy milk to make tofu. For tofu, you are still on the right track with the soy milk you purchase at the supermarket. However, using dried soybeans or soybeans curds is better than making use of store-bought soymilk. 

And when attempting to make homemade tofu with store-bought soy milk, you should know that store-bought contains sweeteners and additives that may affect the texture and consistency of the tofu. 

Downsides Of Using Store-Bought Soy Milk To Make Tofu

Using store-bought soy milk to make your homemade tofu is possible but there are downsides to it. This is why it is recommended to start from scratch by using dried soybeans instead. Check out the disadvantages of using store-bought soy milk below;

1. No Control Over The Consistency

While using store-bought soy milk to make tofu you might lose control over the consistency and texture you prefer. However, this will not be the case if you make use of dried soybeans rather than store-bought soy milk.

2. The Brix

Store-bought soy milk will leave clueless about the brix. Knowing the brix (amount of dissolved solids) of the soymilk is very important when making tofu as it could affect the coagulation and firmness of the tofu. 

3. It Is Not Cost Effective 

Though it is quite easy to make tofu with store-bought soy milk, you’ll be spending more. Using store-bought soy milk for tofu only saves time, it doesn’t save money. So if you want a cost-effective method it is advisable to go for the traditional method of making tofu. 

4. Additives

Most store-bought soy milk contains ingredients that may compromise the texture or firmness of your tofu. Ingredients like sweeteners and oil in soy milk can make the success of making tofu a bit shaky.

How To Make Tofu With Store-Bought Soy Milk Like A Pro

As I mentioned earlier, using store-bought soy milk may be less time-consuming but it can be tricky as well. So if you want that tofu to come out perfect with store-bought soy milk you have to take extra care. 

Nonetheless, you’ll only be needing these 2 simple ingredients you can easily find in your home;

  • Soy Milk (store-bought
  • Lemon or
  • Or Apple cider vinegar (as a substitute for lemon) 

Lemon or apple vinegar are common coagulants you can easily find in your kitchen. However, there are other coagulants you can try out such as Epsom salt, and liquid or powdered Nigari.

Step By Step Instructions For Making Tofu With Store Bought Soy Milk:

Step 1. Measure Your Preferred Coagulant 

Depending on how much tofu you want, you can go ahead to measure the right amount of coagulant perfect for soy milk. For example, if you are using 2 cups of soy milk to make the tofu, you’ll be needing 1 tablespoon of freshly squeezed lemon juice. 

Step 2. Get Your Soy Milk Prepped

With your coagulant ready on the side, next is to prep your milk. Transfer the milk to a pot and bring to a boil on medium heat. Make sure to stir continuously to ensure that the milk doesn’t get burnt. 

Step 3. Add Coagulant

After letting the milk simmer for about 2-3 minutes on medium heat. You can reduce it to low heat or just take the pot off the heat. Add your lemon juice, Apple cider vinegar, or whichever coagulant you choose to use.

While adding the coagulant does not pour all at once. Pour half coagulant and stir vigorously for 5 to 6 minutes. Then add the remaining half but stir slowly and gently this time. 

Step 4. Allow It To Rest

When you start noticing signs of the milk coagulating, it is time to stop stirring and let it sit out for about 10-15 minutes. 

Step 5. Drain

After letting it rest for the slated time, you’ll see that soy milk has taken a whole different form. You’ll be needing tightly woven cotton to help separate the whey( the liquid) and the curds(the solid form). 

Squeeze the content in the woven cotton or cheesecloth to fully drain out the liquid. 

Step 6. Wrap And Press

After the coagulated soy milk is drained, wrap it properly in a bowl, plate, or colander(just in case there’s still liquid left) and place a weighted object to keep it pressed in the shape you want. 

This step should take about 20 minutes to 1 hour. Surely your soy milk has been transformed into tofu by now.

Step 7. Firm It Up

After the previous step, the tofu wouldn’t have taken its perfect form. To improve its firmness, transfer the tofu to a container and put cold water on it. 

Then proceed to refrigerate it for some hours and there you have it, your tofu is completely ready! 

In Summary

If you have store-bought soy milk at home, you shouldn’t doubt that you can make tofu with them. The steps to making tofu with store-bought are pretty easy but it can somewhat be a gamble as there are a few downsides to the method.

However, with the help of this article, you are sure to make tofu with store-bought soy milk like a pro. 

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